Latest News & Announcements

Deep Carbon Observatory - Feb. 26, 2018
The Witwatersrand Basin in southern Africa, one of the oldest geological formations on Earth, began as a shallow sea about 3 billion years ago. Scientists can analyze this water to probe the limits of deep life and to learn how microbes make a living when trapped kilometers beneath the surface.
Paul Voosen, Science - May 31, 2017
It’s no easy feat to drill into the faults that cause earthquakes. Intercepting such active ruptures, which are buried kilometers beneath the surface, requires specialized equipment, skilled crews, and a lot of money and time.
Georgette Chalker - Mar. 24, 2017
Associate Research Scholar Dr. Maggie Lau has been selected as one of two recipients for the 2017 Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) Emerging Leader Awards. Deep Carbon Observatory is a global research program with a goal to transform the understanding of what part carbon plays on planet Earth.
Dr. Maggie Lau - Apr. 10, 2017
Sun beams reaching the surface of Earth not only warm our planet but also provide ample energy to living organisms.  Photosynthetic organisms capture efficiently the light energy to fix carbon and grow, which feed the rest of the food web such as animals, birds and heterotrophic bacteria.
Kenneth Change, New York Times - Sept. 12, 2016
WITWATERSRAND BASIN, South Africa — A mile down in an unused mine tunnel, scientists guided by helmet lamps trudged through darkness and the muck of a flooded, uneven floor.  Leaning a ladder against the hard rock wall, Tullis C. Onstott, a geosciences professor at Princeton.
Tullis C. Onstott - 2016
Now available from Princeton University Press, "Deep Life" takes readers to uncharted regions deep beneath Earth’s crust in search of life in extreme environments and reveals how astonishing new discoveries by geomicrobiologists are helping the quest to find life in the solar system.
Discover Magazine - June 26, 2016
Bacteria found in gold mines and frozen caves show the extreme flexibility of life, and hint at where else we might find it in the solar system. The first time Tullis Onstott ventured underground, he squeezed into an elevator with dozens of South African gold miners and descended a mile.